Chester 4 Goole Town 1 (FA Cup 1st Round) – November 26th 1949

1 – Pre-Match

After five consecutive away ties Chester finally received a home draw for the first time since hosting Bishop Auckland in the 1st Round in 1947. They were the first team out of the bag and paired with the winners of the Goole Town v Scunthorpe United tie which had finished goalless the previous Saturday. Both teams were in the Midland League but top of the table Scunthorpe remained favourites to go through against a side who were bottom of the table with only five points from 13 games.

The replay took place the following Saturday and manager Frank Brown travelled to Goole to watch the game which was abandoned, due to fog, with 15 minutes to go. The home side had been winning 3-1 and the scoreline was repeated the following Monday as Goole sprung a major surprise to reach the 1st Round for the first time since 1915.

Chester Chronicle headline

Remarkably, the Chester tie was scheduled to be Goole’s 10th in the competition that season with four of their Qualifying Round ties needing replays. Having comfortably beaten Barton Town in the Preliminary Round they had needed replays to dispose of Frickley Colliery, Bentley Colliery, Brodsworth Main and Scunthorpe.

The extended cup run partially explained why Goole were rooted to the bottom of the Midland League having played far fewer matches than everyone else. Frank Brown was keen to say that he wouldn’t take the opponents lightly and reported that: “They are a strong workmanlike side who believe in the direct approach to goal.”

Cheshire Observer headline

The part-time visitors had every reason to be confident as Chester themselves were having an up and down season and languished in 17th place although they had beaten Lincoln City 3-1 at Sealand Road the previous week. This improved performance had come on the back of four consecutive defeats and the club were keen to have a good cup run to revive the flagging enthusiasm of supporters.

Frank Hindle
Image Chester Chronicle

The victory over Lincoln had seen Chester make an enforced change. Eric Lee had missed the game due to an amateur international trial match so Frank Hindle, a summer signing from Blackburn Rovers, had been moved from left back to centre half while long-serving Dave McNeil returned to the team for the first time since the opening week of the campaign. Both were set to retain their positions for the Goole match with Hindle’s sturdy build seen as invaluable against robust opponents.

One other positive for Chester was the form of 18 year old defender John Molyneux. The Warrington-born, England youth international had made his debut against Rochdale in September after two years careful development with the ‘A’ team and reserves. He had replaced veteran Eric Sibley, a summer signing from Grimsby, at right back and was considered to be a very bright prospect.

John Molyneux
Image Chester Chronicle
Grenville Booth – Chester Chronicle cartoon

Chester’s only injury concern was on the left wing where another former Grimsby player, Bill Pearson, had picked up an injury against Lincoln. He was expected to be replaced by Grenville “Bunty” Booth, a locally-born school teacher who had made eight league appearances in the 1948/49 season but had yet to feature in the current campaign. Booth had been a regular with the Cheshire County League team but had made his first appearance for the club in wartime football. Although recognised as a half back he was seen as a reliable replacement for Pearson with his height and weight seen as a positive asset against the strong Goole side.

Goole were expected to bring around 1,000 supporters and the game was scheduled to kick off at 2:15pm.

2 – The Match

As expected, Bill Pearson failed to recover from his knee injury and was replaced by Grenville Booth at outside left otherwise Chester lined up with the same side that had beaten Lincoln City the previous week. Meanwhile Goole relied on the same starting eleven that had beaten Scunthorpe in the previous round.

In the end Chester had little difficulty in disposing of their Midland League opponents and once Harry Jackson had put Frank Brown’s team ahead in the first five minutes there was little doubt about the result. Jackson went on to complete a hat-trick as Chester dominated the game and were much the better side. Goole did have a short spell of pressure at the end of the first half but it became a case of how many goals Chester would score.

Chester Chronicle headline

Chester almost opened the scoring in the opening minute. First of all goalkeeper Robert Ferguson had to make a smart save low down from Joe Davies before a smashing drive from Jackson struck the inside of the post and bounced back into play. The respite only lasted until the 4th minute when Jackson collected the ball from Davies and calmly steered the ball past Ferguson.

Harry Jackson

Chester continued to control the game but just before half time Ted Elliott was forced into a brilliant save when he pushed a powerful effort from Pringle round the post.

Early in the second half Brown missed a golden opportunity for Goole before Kimber cleared off the line from Albert Burgess and Ferguson saved well from Jackson. In the 68th minute Chester extended their lead through Jackson and 10 minutes later the centre forward completed his hat-trick when he headed in a Billy Foulkes cross.

Cutts pulled a goal back for Goole, after Brown had hit the post, but the afternoon was rounded off when Burgess added a fourth with two minutes remaining.

It was a comfortable win for Chester and could easily have been more convincing. Grenville Booth did himself justice at outside left and almost scored a couple of goals including a header that hit the underside of the crossbar. Joe Davies also did well at inside right and deserved to be amongst the scorers with two great shots, one of which was brilliantly saved by Ferguson.

Chester – Elliott, Molyneux, McNeil, Astbury, Hindle, Kirkpatrick, Foulkes, Davies, Jackson, Burgess, Booth

Scorer – Jackson 4, 68, 78, Burgess 88

Goole Town – Ferguson, Kimber, Rogers, Sherwood, Towle, Pringle, Cutts, Hall, Hunt, Glasby, Brown

Scorer – Cutts 85

Attendance – 6,774

Chester Chronicle photograph

3- Post-match

The attendance of 6,774 was the lowest FA Cup attendance for a Chester game since 1938 when 6,672 attended the 1st Round match against Bradford City at Sealand Road. It was estimated that 500 Goole fans made the journey, half the original estimate, and the receipts were £525.

The FA Cup match marks the only meeting between Chester and Goole.

Harry Jackson became the first Chester player to score an FA Cup hat-trick since Sammy Armes against Darlington in 1933.

Grenville Booth returned to the Cheshire County League side and made no further first team appearances for the club. He went on to play for Colwyn Bay but remained a teacher in Chester. He died in 1990.

The 2nd Round draw handed Chester a long trip to Devon where they faced Division Three South side Exeter City.

Copyright ©  Chas Sumner http://www.chesterfootballhistory.com All Rights Reserved

Aldershot 1 Chester 0 (FA Cup 2nd Round) – Dec 11th 1948

1 – Pre-Match

After victory at Hartlepools in the 1st Round Chester were once again presented with an away tie, the fifth time in succession that they had been forced to travel. They were paired with the winners of the Ipswich Town v Aldershot tie which had been abandoned on the Saturday with the home side winning 1-0. Ipswich remained firm favourites to go through as they stood 8th in the Third Division South while the Shots were struggling near the bottom of the table.

Chester certainly expected to be making a trip to Ipswich and tentative arrangements were made to acquire hotel accommodation in the town. Manager Frank Brown, who travelled down to watch the replay, stated: “We should be meeting Ipswich but I don’t think we should be beaten if we can maintain our recent form and play the open football we did at Hartlepools.

In the Chester v Wrexham programme, on the day of the replay, details were printed of the long coach trip to Ipswich. Departure was scheduled for 11pm on the Friday night at a cost of £1 8/-9d and time was scheduled for a meal after the match before returning home on what was a mammoth journey.

In the end Aldershot sprung a major surprise by winning 3-0, a result that merely increased Chester’s confidence that they could continue their record of appearing in the 3rd Round for every season since 1935. They had every reason to be positive against a team that had lost their previous three home games. Chester’s form had also taken a turn for the better since the signings of Albert Burgess, Ted Elliott and Duncan Harrigan. While the Shots had been beating Ipswich Frank Brown’s side had recorded a 2-0 win over Wrexham with Burgess again finding the back of the net with a brace.

In the week before the cup tie Chester embarked on what was becoming a traditional training session in Abergele. All the players made the trip with the exception of Reg Butcher, who had a market gardening business to look after, and Eric Lee who was a student at Loughborough college. As usual golf was high on the agenda with ball practice at Abergele United’s ground on the Tuesday along with sprinting and a tactical discussion on the Thursday. Talking to the Chester Chronicle, manager Brown revealed that he had a plan to defeat the Shots while also expressing his admiration for centre half Alf Rowland and goalkeeper Ron Reynolds

The Chester party travelled directly from Abergele to London on Friday afternoon where they stayed overnight before boarding a coach to Aldershot on the Saturday morning.

2 – The Match

There had only been one minor injury concern in the days leading up to the game with Elliott receiving treatment after picking up a leg injury in the previous week’s derby. However the former Wolves keeper responded to treatment and the side remained unchanged from the one that had beaten both Hartlepools and Wrexham.

Although there had been plenty of optimism before the game Chester slipped out of the FA Cup by a single goal despite having the bulk of possession, especially in the second half. The Cheshire Observer felt that they deserved at least a draw but the forwards failed to test Reynolds enough and with the home defence in outstanding form Chester’s inability to finish proved costly.

Chester Chronicle headline
Cheshire Observer headline

The game hinged on one incident after 20 minutes when Burgess squared the ball to Harrigan in a perfect position in front of goal. From only 10 yards out, and with Reynolds completely beaten, the former Aston Villa centre forward struck the underside of the crossbar and the ball rebounded back into play. It was a wonderful chance which should have been seized and with Chester on top at that point a goal would have altered the course of the game.

Only five minutes after this golden opportunity Chester fell behind to a sucker punch. A cross from Ron Hobbs was missed by both Reg Butcher and Eric Lee and met by Jack White who headed a perfect goal past Elliott. Although the keeper got a hand to the ball he could only push the ball against the inside of the post and his movement was hampered by a goalmouth that was a mixture of ankle-deep, mud and sawdust.

Chester Chronicle cartoon

It was doubly unfortunate for the two Chester defenders who were the best performers on the day. Lee was virtually on his own in the second half, repelling Aldershot’s spasmodic attacks, while Butcher was the driving force in the team, pushing his men forward as they endeavoured to get an equaliser.

The Aldershot goal took the sting out of Chester for the remainder of the half although Burgess just failed to connect with a Bert Foulds cross and John Forsyth had chances only to shoot wide with one effort and delay too long with the second opportunity.

After the break it was nearly all Chester although they failed to create many clear cut chances. At the other end Elliott did well to save at point blank range from Frank Rawcliffe and there was a lucky escape when a Hobbs cross shot struck the inside of the upright and was cleared by Tom Mackie.

It was a disappointing result for Chester who had earned a good FA Cup reputation in recent seasons. The problematic area seems to have been the wing halves where Henry Sherwood and John Cropley were quicker to the ball and more determined than their opposite numbers Tommy Astbury and George Williamson. While the Aldershot men provided constant service to their inside forwards both the Chester men had poor games and struggled with their passing.

Despite these problems Chester were not disgraced and only had themselves to blame for not making better use of their chances. On another day it could have been very different.


Aldershot
 – Reynolds, Rogers, Sheppard, Sherwood, Rowland, Cropley, Hobbs, White, Rawcliffe, McNicol, Sinclair

Scorer – White 25

Chester – Elliott, Butcher, Mackie, Astbury, Lee, Williamson, Foulkes, Burgess, Harrigan, Foulds, Forsyth

Attendance – 10,000


3- Post-match

Chester’s elimination from the competition left them to concentrate on their poor league position. Despite a victory in the next home game, against Carlisle, they only won four matches in the second half of the season and ended 18th.

Aldershot went on to meet another Third Division North side in the 3rd Round but progressed no further after a 3-1 loss at Gateshead. In the league they continued to struggle and eventually finished second from bottom and had to apply for re-election. Rowland, the impressive centre half for the Shots, was transferred to Cardiff later in the season for £10,000.

FA Cup ties against First Divison opponents, Blackpool and Stoke City had been financially beneficial in the previous two seasons but the returns in 1948/49 were not so lucrative. Receipts at Hartlepools had been just over £500 while the takings at Aldershot were £842. Chester received half of these sums after deduction of expenses and taxes.

Bert Foulds

Several Chester players appeared in their last FA Cup tie for the club. Bert Foulds, John Forsyth and Tom Mackie were all made available for transfer at the end of the season. Foulds played several games at centre forward in the second half of the season and finished equal top scorer alongside Burgess with 14 goals so it was perhaps a surprise that he was transfer-listed. He initially moved into non-league with Yeovil Town for a season before returning to the Football League with Rochdale, Crystal Palace and Crewe. He died in South Africa in April 1993.

Tom Mackie

Scotsman Mackie, who impressed with some strong tackling in the Aldershot match, had an unlucky time in his short spell at Sealand Road. After receiving concussion in the First Round tie at Hartlepools he was unlucky to break his collar bone in the Christmas Day fixture at Crewe. The injury kept him out of the game until April, when he returned to the Cheshire County League side. However, he could not regain his first team place from Dave McNeil and signed for Runcorn during the summer having only made seven first team appearances. He died in Scotland in February 1989.

John Forsyth, another Scotsman who had started his career at Dumbarton before the war, was a regular at outside left during the 1948/49 season playing 32 league games. A diminutive winger he also played for New Brighton and died in Wallasey in February 1995.

John Forsyth

After a good start, with four goals in his first seven games, Duncan Harrigan began to find goals harder to come by and appearances were intermittent once Ray Westwood returned to the side with Foulds taken over at centre forward. After leaving Chester during the summer he signed for Colwyn Bay and died in February 2005.

Both George Williamson and Reg Butcher played for Chester in the 1949/50 season without appearing in an FA Cup tie. There had been some debate about Willimason’s best position and many people felt he was more comfortable at centre half rather than the half back position where he was deployed at Aldershot. He made 35 appearances during the 1948/49 season but was in and out of the team the following year and asked to be put on the transfer list in March 1950. During the summer of 1950 he moved to Bradford City and revealed his full potential with 223 appearances over the next six years. He was one of the Parader’s most outstanding performers in the 1950s and later played for Colwyn Bay and Oswestry Town and died in 1994.

Captain and Man of the Match Reg Butcher continued to be a regular at right back for the remainder of the campaign but the arrival of Eric Sibley, followed by the emergence of promising youngster John Molyneux saw his appearances limited in 1949/50 although he still managed another 20 league games to take his Chester total to 155. Butcher had originally come to Sealand Road in 1937 after a brief spell as an amateur with Liverpool and they remained his only professional club. The departure of Trevor Walters to Caernarfon in March 1949 had left Butcher as the last player to have played both pre and post war football for the club. In May 1950 he was awarded a testimonial against Blackpool and left the game to concentrate on his fruit and veg business. He died in Birkenhead in October 2000.

Copyright ©  Chas Sumner http://www.chesterfootballhistory.com All Rights Reserved

Hartlepools United 1 Chester 3 (FA Cup 1st Round) – Nov 27th 1948

1 – Pre-Match

For their first match in the 1948/49 FA Cup competition Chester were handed an uninspiring draw at Third Division North rivals Hartlepools United. The North-East side stood in 15th place in the table, two places and one point above Chester, and had won the league fixture at the Victoria Ground in September by two goals to one. The Cheshire Observer bemoaned the club’s fortunes and pointed out that this was the fourth consecutive away draw while the other local sides, Crewe, Tranmere, New Brighton and Wrexham, had all been drawn at home.

The omens were not good for Chester who were without an away win all season and had only picked up two points on their travels, at Crewe and Doncaster. However Hartlepool’s home record provided some hope as they had won four, drawn three and lost three of their 10 league matches. The previous Saturday they had drawn 1-1 with mid-table Mansfield and Frank Brown was optimistic stating: “I think we shall get through and I shall be satisfied if we can force a replay.”

Albert Burgess
Image – Chester Chronicle

Although Chester were struggling in the league there had been an improvement on the playing field since the double signing of inside-forward Albert Burgess from Bolton Wanderers and Duncan Harrigan, a reserve centre forward from Aston Villa. Manager Frank Brown had been keeping an eye on Burgess for some time and beat off competition from three other clubs, including two from the Second Division, to sign the Birkenhead born striker. The fee was considered substantial and matched the amount paid for Ray Westwood the previous year with the deal aided by the sale of inside forward Tommy Best to Cardiff City.

Both players had made their debuts at Oldham Athletic in mid-October and had found the net the following week in a 3-0 win over Accrington Stanley at Sealand Road. That victory had been followed by matches against the top three where, despite only picking up one point, the team had performed admirably, particularly in forcing a goalless draw at Doncaster Rovers. The Saturday before the Hartlepools game Chester had beaten bottom of the table Bradford City 3-0 with Burgess and Harrigan once again finding the net.

Duncan Harrigan
Image – Chester Chronicle

The speed of the two new players was considered a big asset especially with regard to beating a Hartlepools’ offside trap that had proved problematical in the league game at the Victoria Ground. Although there was no special training away from the city the players were able to prepare together and a lot of the tactical talk centred on the experience gained from the previous encounter. Relaxation was provided in the form of golf at Vicar’s Cross and country walks.

There had been one previous meeting in the competition with Chester comfortably beating Hartlepool’s 4-1 in 1931, the first FA Cup tie after joining the Football League.

The kick-off was schedule for 2pm and Chester travelled up to the North-East by train from Liverpool the day before the game.

2 – The Match

There was only one change to the Chester team that had beaten Bradford City the previous week with Ted Elliott replacing George Scales in goal for the first time since fracturing his toe in the defeat at Rotherham at the end of October.

Very few Chester fans made the long journey to the North East and both the Chester Chronicle and Cheshire Observer saw fit to mention the Hope family who set off with the family dog by train at 3am and arrived in Hartlepool at midday after no fewer than six changes. In the event the trip proved memorable with daughter Joyce commenting it was: “a tedious journey, maybe, but the result made it worthwhile.”

Cheshire Observer headline

The Hope family’s away day proved to be so successful largely due to the hard work spent on tactics by Frank Brown. Utilising the pace of forwards Harrigan, Burgess and Bert Foulds, Chester adopted a more direct approach to beat Hartlepool’s renowned offside trap. As the Cheshire Observer commented: “…there was the desire to get the ball into the Hartlepool’s net by the nearest route and in the quickest possible manner.” It was described as Chester’s best performance of the season and the 3-1 scoreline might well have been more emphatic. Veteran Hartlepool manager Fred Westgarth admitted “We were well-licked” and there were no complaints about the defeat.

Most of the credit for the victory went to the forward line with left winger, John Forsyth in particular, proved to be a real handful having his best game since signing from New Brighton. However, Chester were also indebted to centre half Eric Lee who subdued centre forward Harry Hawkins and never put a foot wrong.

The game opened in gathering fog and Chester’s first chance fell to Billy Foulkes who hurried his shot with the ball flying wide of the post. At the other end Elliott had to be alert to make two desperate dives at the feet of the home forwards.

Chester took the lead in the 12th minute when Forsyth whipped the ball across to Foulkes. The right winger delayed his shot, which was blocked by Ray Thomspon, but the ball fell to George Williamson who smashed the ball into the net leaving keeper Norman Rimmington helpless.

George Williamson
Image – Chester Chronicle

The goal spurred on Chester who continued to press forward and Rimmington saved at point-blank range from Forsyth. There was another excellent chance when Harrigan cleverly hung back to beat the offside trap allowing Forsyth to run from the halfway line but with only the goalkeeper to beat he shot wide of the post. Rimmington made further good saves from Burgess (twice) and Harrigan while the latter was also unlucky when his cross-shot missed the target. With Chester surging forward there were so many players in the Hartlepools’ half that when a long clearance found Laurence Nevins he was left with a clear run on goal but Lee performed one of his spectacular tackles to save the day.

On the balance of play Chester deserved to be two or three goals ahead at the interval but they came under sustained pressure early in the second half when full back Tom Mackie was stretchered off the field after going into a tackle with James Isaac. The departure of Mackie saw the home side sense an opportunity and in their best spell of the match they forced an equaliser when John Price headed past Elliott with the Chester defence claiming that the inside left was in an offside position. The goal, on 52 minutes, further encouraged Hartlepools and for five minutes Chester were put under intense pressure but Elliott and his colleagues held firm.

Fortunately for Chester Mackie returned to the field of play after 10 minutes treatment for what turned out to be cramp and the visitors took control of the game. On 68 minutes they regained the lead when Reg Butcher took the ball to the edge of the penalty area and passed to Burgess. From a poor angle the former Bolton man crashed the ball against the crossbar but Harrigan was on hand to steer the ball across the line.

Seven minutes later the tie was put beyond doubt when Forsyth netted with a superb cross shot. Harrigan nearly added a fourth when he used his speed to outpace the Hartlepool’s defence but shot wide of the post. In the final five minutes, with the fog closing in, Elliott made the save of the match from Nevins’ piledriver as the home supporters left the ground in their hundreds.

It had been a great performance from Frank Brown’s side and the Hope family were rewarded for their loyalty by travelling back with the Chester party of players and directors.

Hartlepools United – Rimmington, Leonard, Thompson, Donaldson, Hughes, Newton, Burnett, Isaac, Hawkins, Price Nevins

Scorer – Price 52

Chester – Elliott, Butcher, Mackie, Astbury, Lee, Williamson, Foulkes, Burgess, Harrigan, Foulds, Forsyth

Scorer – Williamson 12, Harrigan 68, Forsyth 75

Attendance – 8,563

3- Post-match

Chester’s victory made it two FA Cup victories out of two against Hartlepools. Since then the clubs have been drawn together twice with a win for Pools in 1952/53 and Chester in 1976/77.

The draw for the 2nd Round gave Chester another away tie against either Aldershot or Ipswich Town. Their tie had been abandoned after just over an hour with Ipswich winning 1-0.

Copyright ©  Chas Sumner http://www.chesterfootballhistory.com All Rights Reserved

Featured Match 1

Hull City 3 Chester 2 (Div 3 North) – Apr 2nd 1949 

Seventy years ago today Chester played in front of their largest ever league attendance when 36,167 spectators attended their Division Three North fixture at Hull. Although there have been larger crowds for cup games, most notably 47,632 for the League Cup semi-final at Aston Villa in 1975 and 45,660 for the FA Cup 3rd Round tie at Manchester United in 1965, this is a record for a Chester league game. 

At the time Hull stood top of the league and were heading for promotion to Division Two while Chester were 16th although they had dropped another two places by the end of the campaign. Amazingly this was not Hull’s largest attendance of the season as they had several crowds above 40,000 with a peak of 49,655 for the Boxing Day match against promotion rivals Rotherham United.

The game itself proved to be a thriller with Chester twice taking the lead through Joe Davies and Albert Burgess before the Tigers fought back to win the game 3-2.

As for home games, the record attendance for a cup game was 20,378 for the FA Cup 3rd round replay against Chelsea in January 1952. In the league, 16,835 attended the February 1933 local derby at Sealand Road when Chester faced Wrexham in the 3rd Division North.

Hull City – Bly, Fowler, Taylor, Greenhalgh, Meens, Mellor, Harrison, Jensen, Moore, Buchan, Burbanks

Scorers: Jensen 37, Moore 66,76

Chester – Elliott, Butcher, McNeil, Beaumont, Lee, Astbury, Davies, Burgess, Foulds, Westwood, Forsyth

Scorers: Davies 35, Burgess 53

Attendance: 36,167

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